Week Eight Blog Activity – Technical: Complete Quiz 8

English for Journalists; Chapter 9 – Words

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Review:  As indicated by Hicks (2013 p.120) “often a writer … adds a redundant word or phrase because they do not know the meaning of a particular word.” This is obvious in my case, and was an interesting concept to learn. I have always said ‘comprised of’ as I wasn’t aware that ‘of’ is redundant.

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Review: The reason why I got this question wrong is obvious; I forgot to answer it! True was going to be my choice however.

Reflection: As much as I have enjoyed these quizzes, I’m relieved to have one less thing to worry about every week. These quizzes have been effective in reinforcing the learnings from the English for Journalists textbook. These quizzes have enabled me to pinpoint areas I need to focus on.


Reference:

CQUniversity 2015, COMM11007 –  Blog Activity Week 8 Quiz – Words, CQUniversity, Mackay

Hicks, J 2013, English for Journalists, 20th anniversary ed., Routledge, Oxon.


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Week Eight Blog Activity – Technical: Complete Quiz 8

Week Seven Blog Activity – Technical: Complete Quiz 7A and 7B

English for Journalists; Chapter 5 – Spelling

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Review: This question is confusing. Funnily enough, it falls under the “confusions” category in the textbook. I obviously read the question wrong, as it claims that the question asked is true. The textbook claims words are misspelled because they’re confused with a shorter one that sounds the same.

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Review: This is where spelling aggravates me. I don’t understand how and why it was necessary when developing the english language, to change the same word when it is a plural. If lady changes to ladies, and penny to pennies, why doesn’t monkey become monkies. I know that this is english law, but I just don’t understand how it came about or why it was necessary.

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Review: I couldn’t see anything in the textbook regarding this, so I googled it. According to The Grammar Monster, ‘principal is an official, whereas principle is a rule or code of conduct’ (2015, p.1). Going off this example, I chose B as the correct answer. However, after examining the feedback for the question, I understand the slight difference in how the question was worded and where I went wrong.

Reflection: Spelling is an area I’m confident in, and I believe that I am a good at spelling. However this quiz didn’t really have much to do with testing spelling as it did practices from the textbook. For my first attempt, I scored 07/10. I was relieved when I saw that none of these incorrect answers were to do with spelling mistakes. I believe my biggest issue is not reading the question thoroughly and understanding what it asks for.

English for Journalists; Chapter 8 – Style

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Review: In hindsight ‘the needs of the reader’ does make sense as the correct answer. All of the elements listed are critical for writing a well-written piece, however the readers needs may emphasise a focus point for the story.

Reflection: I am very happy with the score of this quiz. It makes me happy when I only get a few questions wrong because it makes me believe that what I’m reading is sinking in.


Reference:

CQUniversity 2015, COMM11007 –  Blog Activity Week 7 – Spelling, CQUniversity, Mackay.

CQUniversity 2015, COMM11007 –  Blog Activity Week 7 – Style, CQUniversity, Mackay.

Grammar Monster n.d, ‘Principal and principle – the difference’, viewed on 13 September 2015, http://www.grammar-monster.com/easily_confused/principal_principle.htm

Hicks, J 2013, English for Journalists, 20th anniversary ed., Routledge, Oxon.


Week Seven Blog Activity – Technical: Complete Quiz 7A and 7B

Week Six Blog Activity – Technical: Complete Quiz 6A and 6B punctuation

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Review: I thought I read this question as “what is the most INcorrectly punctuated sentence?”

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Review: I didn’t know that a hyphen and dash were different things. I’ve since learnt that hyphenated word allows for a word to have a combined meaning, such as well-being.

Reflection: My first attempt on this quiz resulted in a score of 8/10. I was quite impressed with my score, I feel as if these quizzes are finally sinking in.

English for Journalists; Chapter 6 – Punctuation (Part B)

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Review: Unfortunately, I wasn’t paying attention with this question.
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Review: I wasn’t wearing my glasses and thought this question was asking me to select the  correctly punctuation sentence.

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Review: This question confused me a little. I wasn’t aware that ‘middle-distance’ was a real thing and therefore didn’t select this as an answer.

Reflection: These quizzes are improving my skills in the areas of grammar and punctuation. I need to slow down and read the questions thoroughly, and also wear my glasses.


Reference:

CQUniversity 2015, COMM11007 – Blog Activity Quiz Week 6- Punctuation, CQUniversity, Mackay.

Hicks, J 2013, English for Journalists, 20th anniversary ed., Routledge, Oxon


Week Six Blog Activity – Technical: Complete Quiz 6A and 6B punctuation

Week Five Blog Activity – Technical: Complete Quiz 5A (Reporting Speech) and Quiz 5B (Figures)

English for Journalists; Chapter 7 – Reporting Speech

Due to answering so many questions incorrectly, I decided not to post all my answers as it would take up too much space.

For my first attempt of this quiz I scored 5/10.  This quiz has shown me the importance of quoting correctly – where to place the inverted commas (does anyone still call them 66 and 99?) and where the full stop should be placed.

This score worried me a little as we’re using quotes and needing correct punctuation in our first assignment, and I certainly don’t want to lose marks for incorrect punctuation. I will be reading over the chapters in great depth every night until I can wrap my head around it.

English for Journalists; Chapter 8 – Figures

The first attempt of this quiz was an abominable failure. I scored 03/10! Thanks to Kate I was able to know that all numbers under 10 are spelled out (unless beginning a sentence). Most of the questions caught me out for not paying attention. I know that numbers cannot begin a sentence, the importance of considering the angle of what you’re writing and the effect of the arrangement of the words.

Reflection: As I repeat each week, I’m learning that there is always room for improvement. I’m really enjoying these quizzes. I’ve found myself switching back to my assessment one piece and brushing over it. I’m constantly correcting any grammatical or punctuation mistakes that could have slipped through. Before this course, I believed that I held a rather firm grasp on punctuation and grammar.


Reference:

CQUniversity 2015, COMM11007 –  Blog Activity Week 5 Quiz – Reporting Speech, CQUniversity, Mackay.

CQUniversity 2015, COMM11007 –  Blog Activity Week 5 Quiz- Figures, CQUniversity, Mackay.

Hicks, J 2013, English for Journalists, 20th anniversary ed., Routledge, Oxon


Week Five Blog Activity – Technical: Complete Quiz 5A (Reporting Speech) and Quiz 5B (Figures)

Week Four Blog Activity – Technical: Complete Quiz 4 – Grammar: Problems and confusions

English for Journalists; Chapter 4 – Problems and Confusions

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Review: It’s obvious from my answer that I wasn’t too certain on an answer for this question. Quite frankly, all the options seemed ludicrous. However, I am now aware of what an absolute adjective is. An absolute adjective refers to an adjective that is absolute or less than what it is (Hicks 2013).

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Review: I found this question quite tricky. I would think that both options are correct as the action happened after another action was taken.
‘The horse was captured after it escaped ..’ It wasn’t captured any other time so technically this option makes sense.
‘The horse was captured after the attendant used her own horse ..’ It wasn’t captured before she used her horse. Perhaps I’m over thinking this question, but according to Hicks (2013 pg. 42) “after refers to later in time”.

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Review: This question confused me a little. I selected the most obvious answer and got it wrong.

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Review: Upon reading the explanation for this question, it cleared up a lot of confusion I had regarding what the question was actually asking.

Reflection: My first attempt on this quiz resulted in a score of 6/10. I wasn’t reading the questions as thoroughly as I needed to. I need to work on correctly using time when constructing sentences. The John Blogg’s touring South Africa question tripped me up because I didn’t read all the answers correctly.

These grammar activities are quite enjoyable and are improving my speech and writing skills as each week goes by.


Reference:
CQUniversity 2015, COMM11007 – Blog Activity Quiz Week 4 – Grammar: Problems and Confusions, CQUniversity, Mackay.

Hicks, J 2013, English for Journalists, 20th anniversary ed., Routledge, Oxon


Week Four Blog Activity – Technical: Complete Quiz 4 – Grammar: Problems and confusions

Week Three Blog Activity – Technical: Complete Quiz 3

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English for Journalists; Chapter 3 – 10 common mistakes

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Review: This question caught me off guard. The length of the sentences and the wording of the question confused me and unfortunately I answered incorrectly.

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Review: Collective nouns are still something I’m working with. After reviewing this question I understand that the answer lies in the word “singular”. The international press is a single body, therefore the answer should have been a singular. An example would be “It’s not often that Dorothy comes around for dinner, but she is tonight.” When simplified, this question was easier to understand.

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Review: Redundant words are new and unfamiliar to me. According to Hicks (2013 p. 36) “if a bond is shared, it is held common.” Redundant words refer to words that are unnecessary, such as ‘more better’ and ‘almost just’. I’ve become aware of using redundant words after reviewing this chapter.

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Review: Deciding whether to use ‘me’ or ‘I’ is an area that remains foggy to me. However, this explanation cleared up any confusion I had.

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Review: This is an area I have a lot of issues with. I quite often use ‘the reason is due to’ in a lot of my writing and it’s a problem I need to work on. ‘Due to’ is another form of a redundant word; the sentence would make sense without the addition of due to.

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Review: Question 10 is another example of a question asking to remove redundant words. It’s apparent that I use many redundant words in my writing and speech as these sentences make sense with the redundant words added.

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Review: I’m still trying to understand collective nouns, subject, verbs etc. This is another area I need to work on.

Reflection: My score on this quiz was abysmal as I had the flu and trying to focus on my studies was impossible. There are many areas of grammar (verbs, adverbs, etc) that I need to wrap my head around and get a better understanding of. Posting such a horrible score on my blog was very daunting, however, I decided to keep with tradition.

Here are some rules that I like to remember, mostly to help me with spelling.

“I before E except after C” – thank you Jackson 5 (I have since discovered there are MANY exceptions to this rule)

“Bananas – B, A, N, A, N, A, S,” – thank you Gwen Stefani

“Beautiful – B E A UTIFUL” – thank you Bruce Almighty.

“No Q without a U” – thank you boyfriend for this addition – if anyone can come up with an exception, please share.

If anyone else who reads this would like to weigh in on their own ways to keep their grammar and spelling in check, I would love to hear them.


Reference: 

Correct Grammar E card 2015, digital image, Rotten E-cards,  viewed 08 July 2015, http://www.rottenecards.com

CQUniversity 2015, COMM11007 –  Blog Activity Quiz Week 3 – Grammar: 10 common mistakes, CQUniversity, Mackay.

Hicks, J 2013, English for Journalists, 20th anniversary ed., Routledge, Oxon.


Week Three Blog Activity – Technical: Complete Quiz 3

Week Two Blog Activity – Technical: Grammar Rules

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English for Journalists; Chapter 3 – Grammar Rules

They’re over there collecting their belongings

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Review:  According to Hicks (2013, p. 18) “there are nine indicative tenses”. This is an area I’m still trying to get my head around. I understand the concept of the basic terms and basic actions, however, I feel like I require a lot of practice in matching which basic term goes with the corresponding action.

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Review: I was taught in school that a noun was a person, place or thing. I believed that was the extent of nouns. However, upon consulting the oracle, I’ve learnt that ordinary nouns are called common nouns, (e.g chair) and special nouns are called proper nouns, e.g George (Hicks 2013). To my understanding, examples of common nouns are; tree, chair, house. Examples of proper nouns are; George, Luke, London, Paris, Friday.

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Review: I’ve always known a verb as a ‘doing word’. However, this idea is an ‘over-simplification’ according to Hicks (2013, p. 18). Running, jumping, skipping are all examples of a verb. However, active, inactive, finite are all foreign concepts to me. From this exercise I’ve learnt that active verbs are the ‘doing word’ and an inactive verb is a state of being or feeling. This is an area I’ve noted that I need to practise.

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Review: I misunderstood this question, and consequently got it wrong. I’m so used to just being able to write whatever is streaming out of my head and not having to ‘construct’ a sentence so that it contains certain elements. This course has so far challenged almost all I thought I knew regarding punctuation and grammar.

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Review: I did not read the answers correctly and rushed into selecting the answer I thought was correct. Upon review of this question I learnt that I need to slow down and read the questions AND answers thoroughly.


Reflection:
  It took three attempts to score 100% on the blog two quiz. My attempts consisted 70% of inaccurate grammatical knowledge and 30% of not reading the question correctly. I remember grammar lessons in primary school, yet as soon as I reached high school, it seems that English lessons were about Shakespeare and Australian literature.

Whilst I am able to quote famous Shakespearean language and can talk to you for hours on end about just how much we have William to thank for shaping the English language, it seems that should you ask me what an intransitive verb is, I wouldn’t be able to tell you.

Alas! Fear not! For I havith thy media writing to thank for re-educating this numbskull!


Reference:

Correct Grammar E card 2014, digital image, Rotten E-cards,  viewed 24 July 2015, http://www.rottenecards.com

CQUniversity 2015, COMM11007 –  Blog Activity Quiz Week 2 – Grammar Rules, CQUniversity, Mackay.

Hicks, J 2013, English for Journalists, 20th anniversary ed., Routledge, Oxon.


Week Two Blog Activity – Technical: Grammar Rules