Week Ten Blog Activity – Practical: Review my blog

All

10 weeks, 30 blog entries and far too many words to count has led to this – the end of my blog. I enjoyed writing each blog entry throughout the term and have gained a considerable amount of knowledge from this media writing course. However, as the term comes to a close, the end of one assessment allows me to redirect my time to another.

So without further ado, here is my review:

The layout of my blog is clean, easy to read and navigate. I kept the layout of my blog minimalistic and easy to digest. I used the same font, colour and size for each blog post.

I have completed a total of 30 blog entries which is the required amount for assessment two. I have referred to the blog task requirements sheet to ensure that I have covered each week’s blog activities.

The major challenges I faced throughout this assessment were keeping up to date with each blog activity and peer-reviewing. Although keeping up to date with the weekly tasks proved to be difficult, I honestly believe that all of my blog tasks have been quite thorough and go beyond a “brief reflection”.

Keeping up with the peer-review each week was quite difficult for me. The bulk of my peer reviews started in week 8 because I didn’t devote enough time to the task throughout the term.

I’m really glad that I worked on the assessment throughout the term and didn’t leave it to the last minute. The review of peers on my blog also helped me to a great deal. Having other students review my blog helped me to correct the punctuation and grammar mistakes that I would’ve lost marks on.

I think the assessment task is appropriately set up and encourages students to keep up to date throughout the term. I didn’t find the weekly activities too involved or too difficult and I think that the weekly content is set out really well and is easy to work through.

My writing skills have improved greatly thanks to the blog activities. I’ve learnt to write shorter sentences, space out my paragraphs more and to read my work out loud to pick up mistakes. I’ve become aware of my grammar and punctuation, the use of ‘it’s/its’ and redundant words.

I’m very happy with my attempt and hope that my efforts are reflected in my grade.

That’s all folks!


Reference:

That’s all Folks! 2015, digital image, Looney Tunes Wiki, viewed on 17 September 2015, <http://looneytunes.wikia.com/wiki/That’s_All_Folks>.


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Week Ten Blog Activity – Practical: Review my blog

Week Ten Blog Activity – Technical: Blog review for technical errors

CheckList

Figure 1.1 – Blog Submission Checklist
Source: DCS online (2015)

This blog entry marks my second last entry for this term. As I’m writing this entry, I can finally breathe a sigh of relief as the term winds down.  After reviewing the blog submission checklist provided by Kate Ames, I’m quite confident that I have addressed all aspects listed.

All of my weekly activities have been clearly marked and I have adhered to the same structure for all 30 entries. These entries have also been categorised and tagged to allow for an easy search throughout the blog. The blog has a uniform and professional setup, all entries are easily accessible through the search bar and side menu.

During the mid-semester blog reviews by the the lecturers, my attention was drawn to how frequently I use ‘it’s’ in sentences that do not contain possession and where an apostrophe is redundant.

I’ve tried to be aware of this issue when writing and hope to nip it in the bud. I have followed frequently referred to the Harvard Referencing guide provided on the CQU website when quoting and referencing. I’ve ensured that all my referencing is uniform throughout however, I have some doubts as to whether I’m referencing correctly.

I’ve made sure to spell out numbers under 10, capitalise all proper nouns and have scrutinised my grammar, punctuation and spelling. The addition of peer review has helped me tremendously as fellow students pick up on the mistakes that I have missed.

An area of importance has been the length of my sentences and paragraphs. I was alerted to this in the review week by Kate. Kate’s review has been extremely valuable as it has highlighted areas that I need to focus on.

Upon receipt of my assessment one piece, I was made aware of certain areas of punctuation and sentence structure that I was able to cross-reference with assessment two. I hope that I have cleared up all issues with grammar, punctuation and spelling in my posts and do not loose marks in this area.

In conclusion, I’m very satisfied with my blog and believe I have adhered to the blog submission checklist quite well.



Reference:

Academic Learning Centre ALSU, 2015, Edition T1 An Abridged Guide to the Harvard Referencing Style, viewed 17 September 2015, https://www.cqu.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0010/14032/2015_Harvard_Guide_11_Feb_with_colour_Ing.pdf

Ames, K 2015, COMM11007 Week 10 – Blog Submission Checklist, Central Queensland University, Mackay. 

Clipboard checklist 2015, digital image, DCS Series,  viewed on 17 September 2015 http://www.digitalcombatsimulator.com/en/files/1459501/


Week Ten Blog Activity – Technical: Blog review for technical errors

Week Ten Blog Activity – Inquiry: Visual Consumer review

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Figure 1.1 – Bunnings Warehouse
Source: Bunnings Warehouse website (2015)

For this week’s blog activity, I’ve chose Bunnings Warehouse as the website to review. I’ll admit, I’m a nerd when it comes to all things gardening. Bunnings is my ultimate shop – an odd thing to come from a 21 year-old female. I could spend hours wandering the aisles, spending a lot of money and making my gardens and home look fantastic –  if I do say so myself.

As I was reading through this week’s study guide, it occurred to me that Bunnings Warehouse would be an ideal website to cover. The website addresses all the elements mentioned in the study guide and made it quite easy to relay the week’s learnings to real life.

Words
The use of words correctly is paramount for the Bunnings Warehouse website. Visitors of the website need to be able to understand precisely what an object is, how it looks and what it is used for. Each item’s description needs to incorporate concrete words accompanied by qualifier words (Ames 2015) to help the consumer understand what they’re reading.

This example uses concrete words and qualifier words to enable the visitor to understand the product. “Lattice” is the concrete word, without anything else the consumer wouldn’t know too much detail about the product. “Brown, Hardwood” are the qualifier words; these are descriptive and enable the consumer to envision the product and interpret as intended.
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Figure 1.2 – Excerpt Lattice Fencing
Source: Bunnings Warehouse website (2015)

Logos

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Figure 1.3 Bunnings Warehouse logo – Figure 1.4 Bunnings Warehouse motto
Source: Bunnings Warehouse website (2015)

The Bunnings Warehouse logos follow the KISS principle – an easy to read, simple design that is eye-catching. These logos both provides a very effective example brand recognition.

According to Gillikin (2015, p.1) a logo is a ‘graphical display of a company’s unique identity’. The logos are recognisable and identifiable to consumers throughout Australia. Figure 1.4 is an example of relaying a message through a logo (Ames 2015). Bunnings have incorporated a hammer as part of their logo – this conveys information about the company and allows readers to gain and understanding that Bunnings Warehouse is a hardware store.


Trademarks
I was unable to find any registered or pending trademarks of Bunnings/Bunnings Warehouse/ Lowest prices are just the beginning. I searched the web address provided and it showed no results. Even though Bunnings does not have a registered trade mark, the phrase “lowest prices are just the beginning” and the image of a hammer in a circle are widely consumer-known trademarks of Bunnings.

Colour
Bunnings Warehouse’s signature colour is dark green, which according to Ames (2015 2015) is reflective of nature and safety. The signature green is a secondary hue made of blue and yellow which has a low colour value with a lower saturation.

The background colours of the website are primarily neutral and natural colours. The colours featured are grey, black, the signature green and red highlights. The website addresses the rule indicated by Ames (2015, p.3) of ‘light coloured fonts on dark coloured backgrounds’.

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Figure 1.5 – Bunnings Warehouse Menu
Source: Bunnings Warehouse website (2015)


Font
The font throughout the Bunnings website is simple and easy to read. I suspect they use a sans serif font as the this style would be most effective for the website. This selection of font is easier to understand and interpret (Ames 2015).


Graphics
The graphics used on the website are pictures of the products that the company sells. According to Ames (2015, p.4) ‘graphics assist understanding and complement the message’. The website uses photos and illustrations to provide extra information about a product. The photos used are high resolution, clear and compliment the message of the product.

Where not an image is unavailable, the website features an illustration that is a representation of the product.

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Figure 1.6 – Fencing Accessory
Source: Bunnings Warehouse website (2015)

Balance
The Bunnings Warehouse website has a range of styles depending on what page you click on. The products page features an asymmetrical balance – the left hand side of the page contains a navigation bar, the centre of the page contains the product listing and the right hand side is blank. The welcome page of the website is symmetrical; there is a even amount of information down the centre of the web page and no where else on the page.

Sound
The website doesn’t contain sound unless the viewer opts to watch a D.I.Y video. However, Bunnings Warehouse have a signature jingle that accompanies advertisements and the companies slogan (Ames 2015).

Reflection: I enjoyed completing this task for week ten. Partially because it is one of the final blog activities and partially because I enjoy applying the learnings to aspects of life.

Whilst reading through the study guide and referring it to something familiar, it was interesting to see the strategies and tactics companies use in order to create brand recognition.


Reference:

Ames, K 2015, COMM11007 Week 10 – Impact of design, Central Queensland University, Mackay.

Bunnings Warehouse 2015, viewed on 17 September 2015, available from http://www.bunnings.com.au/?gclid=CLmcys7C_8cCFcUrvQodwqQMuQ

Gillikin, J n.d, ‘Importance of Logos in Business‘, viewed 17 September 2015, http://smallbusiness.chron.com/importance-logos-business-577.html

Week Ten Blog Activity – Inquiry: Visual Consumer review