Week Nine Blog Activity – Inquiry: Review two examples of curation

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Trip Advisor’s compilation of the best 25 hotels in the world is a example of effective, succinct curation. According to Bhargava (2011, cited in Michiel Gaasterland), effective content curation involves ‘sharing the best and most relevant content on a specific issue’.

Trip advisor has achieved this by using reviews from its customers that accompany illustrations to add value to the piece (Bradshaw 2013). This is an effective strategy as readers can relate to these reviews; they are real reviews from people who have experienced the hotels.

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CNT’s collection of gold standard hotels is very informative. Gaasterland (2011) acknowledges that good curation involves using only the most specific and best information.

CNT has provided a walk-through description of each hotel; they provide information on aspects of the hotel that the reader would be interested in knowing – the food, the grounds, what activities are available etc.

The website accompanies limited visual aid to the hotel information. This results in the reader having to be directed elsewhere from the site to view the hotel in more depth.

Both of these websites are targeted at an audience for an intended purpose – to provide them with information on the best hotels for 2015 (Ames 2015). Although very similar in target audience and intended purpose, both are very different in design.

Trip Advisor’s website is very clean, well set out and easy to read. Each hotel is promoted succinctly; each section provides 4 images and a short quote taken from customer reviews from the original hotel page.

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Each section features a “more” option that will redirect the reader to the hotel’s Trip Advisor page that features all the excess information that the reader may require.

CNT’s website is condensed to the point of clutter; each section on the featured hotel is one large paragraph. Although this paragraph is very informative, it is difficult to read and could deter the reader due to overwhelming information.

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CNT provides direct links to the featured hotel’s website. The website provides an overview of the hotel and then redirects the reader elsewhere. This could disruption could be annoying to the consumer as they then have to navigate another website.

Reflection: Reviewing both of these websites was quite enjoyable and appealed to the wanderlust in me. It’s very interesting to see how two websites with the same intended audience and purpose can vary so greatly in design.

If I was to (and I’m sure I will) recommend, or choose a website for personal use, Trip Advisor would be my selection. This is mostly due to previous experience with the company and the easy to navigate website. Content curation was a foreign concept to me, but now I have a better understanding thanks to the internet and links provided in this week’s learning material.


Reference List:

Ames, K 2015, COMM11007 Week 9 – Content Generation vs Content Collaboration, Central Queensland University, Mackay.

Bradsaw, P 2013, ‘Journalism *is* curation: tips on curation tools and techniques‘, viewed on 17 September 2015, http://onlinejournalismblog.com/2013/09/30/curation-tools-tips-advice-journalism/

Condé Nast Traveller (CNT) 2015, Gold Standard Hotels 2015,  viewed on 17 September 2015, http://www.cntraveller.com/awards/the-gold-list/gold-standard-hotels-2015/viewall

Gaasterland, M 2011, ‘What is Content Curation? And how it’s useful to you and your network‘, viewed on 17 September 2015, http://www.michielgaasterland.com/content-marketing/what-is-content-curation-and-how-it%E2%80%99s-useful-to-you-and-your-network/

Percolate 2012, What is curation?, video, viewed on 17 September 2015, https://vimeo.com/38524181

Trip Advisor 2015, ‘Top 25 Hotels – World‘, viewed on 17 September 2015, http://www.tripadvisor.com.au/TravelersChoice-Hotels-g1

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Week Nine Blog Activity – Inquiry: Review two examples of curation

Week Nine Blog Activity – Technical: Active and Passive Writing

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Figure 1.0 – Active Vs Passive
Source: Blitzmetrics (2014)

According to Whitaker, Ramsay and Smith (2012, p.91), ‘One of the most common guidelines for effective writing is to prefer active voice’. This allows for a more direct and stronger portrayal of what the writer is trying to convey to the reader.

Active voice refers to a subject performing an action whereas passive voice refers to an action being done to the subject (Whitaker, Ramsay & Smith 2012).

The Business Writing Centre provides a fantastic active vs. passive activity which encourages changing the structure of sentences from passive to active.

I completed the task required and was quite surprised that I got a few questions correct with some questions only having minor details wrong. I’m finding myself questioning every sentence that I’m constructing, and scrutinising whether it’s active or passive.

As I was working through the activity, some answers indicated the sentence was able to be shortened. In converting the sentence from passive to active, some unnecessary words were cut. For example question two – the correct version has been condensed and excess words removed.

Some of the questions that I got “wrong” had not been condensed and indicated areas where I needed to gain more insight into what passive voice is and how to re-arrange it to make it active voice.

Screen Shot 2015-09-16 at 3.30.12 pm Screen Shot 2015-09-16 at 3.30.26 pmScreen Shot 2015-09-16 at 3.30.45 pmReflection: Overall, I’m glad that I have an understanding of active and passive voice and am becoming increasingly aware of how all these components that we are learning in this course are helping shape each sentence I construct.


Reference:

Active vs Passive cookie jar 2014, digital image, Blitzmetrics, viewed on 16 September 2015, https://blitzmetrics.com/identifying-and-eliminating-passive-voice/

Business Writing Centre1997, ‘Passive and Active Voice’, viewed on 16 September 2015, http://www.businesswriting.com/tests/activepassive.htm

Whitaker, WR, Ramsey, JE & Smith, RD 2012, Media Writing: Print, Broadcast and Public Relations, 4th edition, Routledge, New York.

Yu, D 2014, ‘Identifying and eliminating passive voice‘, viewed on 16 September 2015, https://blitzmetrics.com/identifying-and-eliminating-passive-voice/


Week Nine Blog Activity – Technical: Active and Passive Writing